MIXED ECONOMY

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BANK HOLIDAY WEEKENDS are rarely, if ever, what everyone hopes for. I’ve always enjoyed them though, probably because I’m content not to set the bar too high. This kind of a day, a no commitments kind of day, frees up heart and soul and mind and body to do what a beloved late Aunt of mine used to call “a bit of this and that”. This kind of a day finds multifarious degrees of contentment in sunshine or in rain.

A bit of catching up on sleep, a longer than usual phone call with my Mum, a bit of drawing / painting / photography. Some mooching around the garden in between the showers, time to cogitate and meditate, and the early pages of Michael Ramsey prize-winning Atheist Delusions: The Christian Revolution and Its Fashionable Enemies by David Bentley Hart, words from whose Introduction hearten and encourage me to discover what he has to say:

I make no attempt here to convert anyone to anything. Indeed, the issue of my personal belief or disbelief is quite irrelevant to – and would be surprisingly unilluminating of – my argument …

Funny thing is that I’m quite frequently “converted” by non-aggressive conversation or writing – and almost always turned off by those who, with a gleam in their eye and that “certain kind of a smile”, are patently determined to “convert” me to one of their theories in the shortest time it could possibly take them. The kind of metanoia or “conversion” I’m so much more interested in is very much more like Bank Holiday weekends. Mixed economy. Time and space for a turning around through 360 degrees. Time and space to see things in a new way. Time to wake up and smell the coffee, time to sleep and wake up to the scent of a light drizzle on flower petals in the garden. Time to discover, as Maggi Dawn tweeted earlier today: “I can’t believe I just slept for 14 hours. I didn’t know it was humanly possible.”

This kind of “repentance”, this kind of “conversion” ought to be routinely incorporated into our Growth Action Planning. Indeed I wonder whether another name for the mixed economy of a Bank Holiday Weekend might be “prayer”.