ST ANDREW

OUR MIDWEEK Eucharist this morning took us in heart and mind to the shores of Galilee and to Simon Peter’s younger brother Andrew introducing him to Jesus. Like other young men and women, before and after them, these brothers would give their whole lives to the cause that Jesus of Nazareth represented to them. They lived and died in the light of a message that contained the seeds of salvation for all humankind. They stood up to whatever cruel or bullying power they encountered. Like their Master, these brothers and others like them, and sisters too, surrendered their own lives so that, for all time, humankind might come to recognise God who wills Life and salvation, here and now, for all. We’ve been seeing signs of this new life on the steps of St Paul’s Cathedral, in Libya, in Egypt, in Syria, in the Leveson inquiry. There’s an apparently new arising. A new word on the streets. Potentially both purer politics and purer religion. Maybe we’ve been sensing this new life, too, in openhearted souls. Maybe we’re beginning to turn away from the notion of crucifixion’s being a good or necessary thing, for anyone, physically or metaphorically. Maybe we’re beginning truly to “repent”, to look again …